Known - definition of known by The Free Dictionary

Know legal definition of know - Legal Dictionary

Know | Definition of Know by Webster's Online Dictionary

The definition of knowledge is a matter of ongoing among in the field of . The classical definition, described but not ultimately endorsed by , specifies that a must meet three in order to be considered knowledge: it must be , , and . Some claim that these conditions are not sufficient, as examples allegedly demonstrate. There are a number of alternatives proposed, including 's arguments for a requirement that knowledge 'tracks the truth' and 's additional requirement that we do not want to say that those who meet any of these conditions 'through a defect, flaw, or failure' have knowledge. suggests that our definition of knowledge requires that the evidence for the belief necessitates its truth.

Know–how | Definition of Know–how by Merriam-Webster

Know-how legal definition of know-how - Legal Dictionary

Knowledge can refer to a or understanding of a subject. It can be implicit (as with practical skill or expertise) or explicit (as with the theoretical understanding of a subject); it can be more or less formal or systematic. In , the study of knowledge is called ; the philosopher famously defined knowledge as "", though this definition is now agreed by most analytic philosophers to be problematic because of the . However, several definitions of knowledge and theories to explain it exist.

Definition of know–how: knowledge of how to do something smoothly and efficiently : expertise. See know–how defined for English-language learners.

The definition of knowledge is a matter of ongoing debate among philosophers in the field of epistemology. The classical definition, described but not ultimately endorsed by Plato, specifies that a statement must meet three criteria in order to be considered knowledge: it must be justified, true, and believed. Some claim that these conditions are not sufficient, as Gettier case examples allegedly demonstrate. There are a number of alternatives proposed, including Robert Nozick's arguments for a requirement that knowledge 'tracks the truth' and Simon Blackburn's additional requirement that we do not want to say that those who meet any of these conditions 'through a defect, flaw, or failure' have knowledge. Richard Kirkham suggests that our definition of knowledge requires that the evidence for the belief necessitates its truth.

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